ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

Conference Overview

The Caspian Security Conference organized by the Washington-based Caspian Policy Center and the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies (NESA Center) of the U.S. National Defense University, will explore the future of security for the Greater Caspian Region following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Conference sessions will examine the following questions:

  • What role can the United States play in helping Caspian countries maintain positive relations with all partners in the region?
  • How can the United States and Caspian countries work together to stabilize Eurasian markets in the wake of Russian sanctions and prevent sanction busting?
  • How can the United States and its European allies work with the Caspian region to ensure stable energy markets in the wake of Western disengagement from the Russian energy market?
  • What can the Caspian countries do to insulate themselves from potential security threats stemming from the invasion of Ukraine?
  • How can the United States and its allies aid the Caspian countries in countering security threats from malign actors?

Can the United States and its NATO allies create successful comprehensive national security partnerships with Caspian countries?

After gaining independence, the countries of the South Caucasus and Central Asia quickly set out to build international relationships, protect their sovereignty, and safeguard their national security. The United States began forming political and security relationships with the Caspian region and all eight countries joined the NATO Partnership for Peace. During the U.S. and NATO mission in Afghanistan, countries on both sides of the Caspian Sea provided essential assistance to the United States and Europe. International forces departed Afghanistan on August 31, 2021, leaving the political and security outlook of the country and its neighbors in question. Then, early in January 2022, the region saw CSTO troops deployed for the first time to Kazakhstan and on February 24 Russia invaded Ukraine.

The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine have demonstrated a need to reevaluate relations with traditional security partners and great powers, leaving the Caspian countries in the difficult position of determining their security future. As the United States and Europe come together to impose heavy sanctions on Russia, the Caspian region must navigate complex political, defense, and economic ties between Russia and the West. The countries of the region will need to develop and employ decisive, creative, and cooperative solutions to both protect their national security and to collaborate with a diverse set of international partners.

The Caspian Security Conference organized by the Washington-based Caspian Policy Center and the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies (NESA Center) of the U.S. National Defense University, will explore the future of security for the Greater Caspian Region following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Conference sessions will examine the following questions:

  • What role can the United States play in helping Caspian countries maintain positive relations with all partners in the region?

  • How can the United States and Caspian countries work together to stabilize Eurasian markets in the wake of Russian sanctions and prevent sanction busting?

  • How can the United States and its European allies work with the Caspian region to ensure stable energy markets in the wake of Western disengagement from the Russian energy market?

  • What can the Caspian countries do to insulate themselves from potential security threats stemming from the invasion of Ukraine?

  • How can the United States and its allies aid the Caspian countries in countering security threats from malign actors?

  • Can the United States and its NATO allies create successful comprehensive national security partnerships with Caspian countries?

After gaining independence, the countries of the South Caucasus and Central Asia quickly set out to build international relationships, protect their sovereignty, and safeguard their national security. The United States began forming political and security relationships with the Caspian region and all eight countries joined the NATO Partnership for Peace. During the U.S. and NATO mission in Afghanistan, countries on both sides of the Caspian Sea provided essential assistance to the United States and Europe. International forces departed Afghanistan on August 31, 2021, leaving the political and security outlook of the country and its neighbors in question. Then, early in January 2022, the region saw CSTO troops deployed for the first time to Kazakhstan and on February 24 Russia invaded Ukraine.

The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine have demonstrated a need to reevaluate relations with traditional security partners and great powers, leaving the Caspian countries in the difficult position of determining their security future. As the United States and Europe come together to impose heavy sanctions on Russia, the Caspian region must navigate complex political, defense, and economic ties between Russia and the West. The countries of the region will need to develop and employ decisive, creative, and cooperative solutions to both protect their national security and to collaborate with a diverse set of international partners.